More IRS Enforcement on the Horizon

It’s not a secret that the Internal Revenue Service has been understaffed for quite some time. However, the IRS has announced that for the first time in five years there will be significant enforcement hires (between 600 and 700 new employees). Although the IRS is still suffering from years of successive budget cuts totaling almost $1 billion the IRS has, over the course of the last year, received funds that allow it to address its most dire staffing needs.

In announcing the new hires, IRS Commissioner, John Koskinen, provided an overview of how these decisions are made. According to Koskinen, earlier this year Congress provided $290 million specifically earmarked for taxpayer service, identity theft and cybersecurity. The more recent availability of funds necessary to fund the enforcement staffing was recognized through certain work efficiencies and the rate of attrition in enforcement.  

A cursory review of fiscal years 2014 and 2015 staffing illustrates that collection personnel such as Revenue Agents and Revenue Offices, have been two of hardest hit functions of the IRS. In fact, from 2014 to 2015 each role lost 10% of its workforce at a time when many other functions had almost no losses and some even added positions. Interestingly, Commissioner Koskinen, in his announcement, highlighted the fact that each enforcement position typically returns almost $10 for every dollar spent – and many times, much more. 

The enforcement hiring will be introduced in two waves, one in the next few weeks and the second wave later this year. The initial hiring will focus on entry-level positions in SB/SE (small business/self-employed) while the hires in the latter part of the year will assist with more high-profile enforcement areas.

It’s difficult to know the practical impacts on taxpayers, collection inventory and practitioners prior to implementation, yet it’s safe to say that there probably hasn’t been this much reason to be proactive in respect to resolving a collection case in six years. I think it’s reasonable to speculate that the hiring initiative together with the IRS’ Early Action Initiative and the private debt collection authorized by the FAST Act are going to shake things up. 

For the full Koskinen article, click here.