IRS Turning to Private Tax Debt Collectors

Beginning in the spring of 2017, the IRS is going to take yet another run at using private debt collectors to go after its inactive tax liabilities. This is the third go around for the IRS using private debt collectors—the first two efforts, one in 1996 and the other from 2006-2009, were abandoned due to concerns over their cost-effectiveness and how the private collectors conducted themselves. Despite those failures, in December of 2015 Congress passed the Fixing America’s Surface Transportation Act (FAST Act), which included a provision that the IRS is required to use private collection agencies for the collection of outstanding inactive tax receivables.

Most recently, the IRS announced the four contractors that will be charged with the task of implementing the program across the country. They are as follows:

  • Conserve Fairport, New York
  • Pioneer Horseheads, New York
  • Performant Livermore, California
  • CBE Group Cedar Falls, Iowa

In this announcement, the IRS has offered clarity on the accounts being assigned to these collection agencies. The agencies will work on accounts where taxpayers owe money, but the IRS is no longer actively working their accounts. Several factors contribute to the IRS assigning these accounts including older, overdue tax accounts or lack of resources preventing the IRS from working the cases. The IRS has also clarified that it will not assign accounts to private collection agencies involving taxpayers who are:

  • Deceased
  • Under the age of 18
  • In designated combat zones
  • Victims of tax-related identity theft
  • Currently under examination, litigation, criminal investigation or levy
  • Subject to pending or active offers in compromise
  • Subject to an installment agreement
  • Subject to a right of appeal
  • Classified as innocent spouse cases
  • In presidentially declared disaster areas and requesting relief from collection

In disclosing the selection of its collection contractors, the IRS offered only a few more details on the ways in which these companies will interact with taxpayers and their representatives. According to the release, the IRS will give each taxpayer and their representative written notice that their account is being transferred to a private collection agency. The agency will then send a second, separate letter to the taxpayer and their representative confirming the transfer. The IRS also offered an assurance that as a condition of the contract the agencies must respect taxpayer rights, including abiding by the consumer protection provisions of the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act.

Despite well founded concerns with taxpayer rights and privacy as well as the ongoing flood of IRS-related phone scams, implementation of the law probably couldn’t come at a tougher time. The IRS indicates that it, “will do everything it can to help taxpayers avoid confusion and understand their rights and tax responsibilities.” Seemingly, in direct response to a ploy of the scams, the IRS has said that the private collection agencies will not ask for payment on a prepaid debit card and that all payments should be payable to the U.S. Treasury and sent directly to IRS.

The hope is that prior to implementation, the IRS will offer even more details about how these companies plan to conduct themselves. Any complaints or issues with the private debt collectors should be reported by calling the Treasury Inspector General for Tax Administration (TIGTA) hotline at 800-366-4484 or by visiting