Holiday Hiring: Don’t Forget About Tax Regulations

Retailers and seasonal companies currently on a hurried hiring spree for the holiday season would be wise to slow down enough to ensure they are complying with all required tax regulations, according to experts in the tax resolution business.

“Because seasonal hiring often occurs in a hurry, it’s important that businesses adhere to their usual hiring policies and processes so they don’t overlook critical tax documentation and considerations,” said Brian Biffle, president of 20/20 Tax Resolution in Broomfield, Colo. “First and foremost, it’s important to remember that part-time and seasonal employees are subject to the same tax withholding rules that apply to any other employees.”  

To ensure against unexpected tax issues, it’s important that businesses have the resources and the record-keeping systems in place to manage an influx of temporary employees during the busy season, according to Biffle. Maintaining accurate records is not only critical with respect to payroll issues, but also down the road should problems arise. In addition, there are a number of other considerations that must be addressed, Biffle said. For example:

  • Correctly identifying employment status (1099 or W2)
  • Incorporating additional administrative costs (payroll management, for example) into hiring plans
  • Ensuring any potential health care coverage costs (if required for seasonal employees working 30 hours or more per week) are factored into hiring decisions – a rare requirement based on a variety of criteria but worth verifying when making hiring decisions
  • Anticipating the unexpected and planning accordingly

“The retail business especially can be unpredictable, particularly if a ‘hot’ item captures consumer attention creating additional hiring needs. So it’s smart for employers to examine all variables that may impact the bottom line – including hiring costs,” Biffle said. “It can be very easy to neglect costs like these during the rush of the season when business is plentiful, but doing so can put a business in a serious financial bind.”

Conversely, Biffle said that seasonal workers should pay attention to any tax implications created by accepting a holiday job. Workers should ensure they factor in tax withholding to cover any tax liability (whether done through the employer or as a self-employed individual), including federal income tax, state income taxes, Social Security and Medicare (FICA) taxes, as well as any local taxes that may be required.