Glitch in IRS Direct Debit Installment Agreements

Direct debit installment agreements (DDIAs) allow taxpayers to make payments through a monthly direct debit from their bank or other shared draft account. From 2011 to 2015 the overall installment agreement default rate was often twice as high as the default rate of DDIAs. Yet, despite the apparent overall success of the DDIA program, we have found a recent pattern of issues with these agreements.

For years, our firm has been establishing resolutions for taxpayers around the country. We have found that monitoring the agreement after it has been established to ensure that both the IRS and the taxpayer abide by the terms set forth in agreement is crucial to the long-term success of these resolutions. Recently, in the course of our monthly monitoring of an agreement set up in May of 2015, we discovered that the plan was being defaulted. This was curious because the taxpayer had not missed any monthly payments or missed or made any other tax payments late.

In February, the IRS US Mailboxissued its formal default letter, Notice CP523 “Notice of Intent to Levy – Intent to Terminate your Installment Agreement” to the taxpayer. The notice stated that the taxpayer’s installment agreement payment was overdue and that the agreement would be terminated due to missed payments.  The explanation for the default raised even more questions because research illustrated that the IRS had not even attempted its most recent draft of the taxpayer account.

The events prompted extensive research with IRS Customer Service. Eventually, it was determined that due to an IRS error there was, in fact, no attempt made to debit many taxpayer accounts on DDIAs. The IRS then compounded its error by erroneously issuing default notices to the taxpayers whose payments were not drafted as though the taxpayers themselves had missed the payments.

In an ironic twist, at almost the exact same time that we discovered the IRS error in our case, the Treasury Inspector General for Tax Administration (TIGTA) released a report titled Direct Debit Installment Agreement Procedures Addressing Taxpayer Defaults Can Be Improved. In short, the report found that, “As a result, systemic DDIA defaults increased taxpayer burden because taxpayers incurred additional interest on their unpaid balances. In addition, revenue collection was suspended until the DDIAs were restructured, and some were not reestablished.” 

Thankfully, we learned through the IRS that letters outlining the erroneously issued default notices would be mailed to all taxpayers affected by the glitch. All installment agreements erroneously defaulted would be reinstated with payments continuing as usual moving forward. Despite the recent hiccup and the concern of TIGTA with DDIA defaults, the program still offers the most reliable way for taxpayers and the IRS to enter into lasting agreements.