Credit Bureaus to Lessen Impact of Federal Tax Liens

For many years, there has been one thing that taxpayers can count on when taxes are owed to the Internal Revenue Service (IRS): A Notice of Federal Tax Lien (NFTL) being filed. While the NFTL is primarily used by the IRS to secure its liability against a taxpayer’s right, title and interest in property it has also become a rather harsh reflection of one’s credit worthiness, something many consumer advocates have strong opposition to.

With that said, big changes may be on the horizon for taxpayers that owe the IRS unpaid taxes. Recent reports indicate that the credit industry is on the verge of adopting new rules that could minimize—or do away with altogether—the negative impact tax liens have on credit scores. This is a noteworthy departure from current procedure in which tax liens cost taxpayers significant credit points.

On July 12, 2016, according to a post on Credit.com, as part of its National Consumer Assistance Plan (the result of a settlement brokered with 31 state attorneys general back in 2015), Equifax, Experian and TransUnion are planning to significantly reduce the amount of tax-lien and civil-judgment information found in consumer credit files. Details have yet to be finalized, but “there will be less of that type of data in credit reports moving forward,” according to Stuart K. Pratt, president and CEO of the Consumer Data Industry Association, a trade association that represents the credit bureaus, confirmed to Credit.com. Testing is currently underway and a final plan regarding the information is expected to be implemented in July 2017.

 

If we rewind back to 2011, the IRS announced its own attempt at mitigating some of the negative impacts of NFTLs through the Fresh Start Initiative. According to an IRS press release at the time, “The goal is to help individuals and small businesses meet their tax obligations, without adding unnecessary burden to taxpayers. Specifically, the IRS is announcing new policies and programs to help taxpayers pay back taxes and avoid tax liens.” The changes to lien protocol did not, of course, change the way that a lien would be scored in by the credit reporting process. Instead, the Fresh Start Initiative was a collection of procedural changes that provided more alternatives to the traditional lien process.

Interestingly, studies show that the filing of an NFTL by the IRS actually assists in the collection of tax dollars. And yet despite this factual evidence, the IRS has chosen a course of action that yields far fewer notices of liens than any time in the past decade. Still, the proposed changes by the credit bureaus must give the IRS pause for additional thought into the subject. At this point, only time will tell exactly how the rules are changed within the credit industry and we should get a better idea towards the end of this year and in to 2017—observers will want to continue to pay attention to the IRS’ response. It’s only been five years since the IRS’ Fresh Strat Initiative lien changes and there are no significant IRS budget increases on the horizon. It seems unlikely that any major shifts will occur within the IRS as a result of the credit bureaus changing their rules.