Category Archives: Payroll

[Infographic] 5 Common Business Owner Payroll Myths: Debunked

When it comes to running a business, ensuring that payroll obligations are met, both to employees and all applicable taxing authorities, doesn’t come without challenges. While there are a wide variety of resources available to help businesses of all sizes manage their payroll obligations, perhaps no other challenge can be as “taxing” (particularly for small- to medium-sized companies) as ensuring that these obligations are met.

If you own a company, take some time to familiarize yourself with some of the most common myths many business owners believe when addressing their payroll tax concerns.

 

Five Common Payroll Myths Debunked

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Holiday Hiring: Don’t Forget About Tax Regulations

Retailers and seasonal companies currently on a hurried hiring spree for the holiday season would be wise to slow down enough to ensure they are complying with all required tax regulations, according to experts in the tax resolution business.

“Because seasonal hiring often occurs in a hurry, it’s important that businesses adhere to their usual hiring policies and processes so they don’t overlook critical tax documentation and considerations,” said Brian Biffle, president of 20/20 Tax Resolution in Broomfield, Colo. “First and foremost, it’s important to remember that part-time and seasonal employees are subject to the same tax withholding rules that apply to any other employees.”  

To ensure against unexpected tax issues, it’s important that businesses have the resources and the record-keeping systems in place to manage an influx of temporary employees during the busy season, according to Biffle. Maintaining accurate records is not only critical with respect to payroll issues, but also down the road should problems arise. In addition, there are a number of other considerations that must be addressed, Biffle said. For example:

  • Correctly identifying employment status (1099 or W2)
  • Incorporating additional administrative costs (payroll management, for example) into hiring plans
  • Ensuring any potential health care coverage costs (if required for seasonal employees working 30 hours or more per week) are factored into hiring decisions – a rare requirement based on a variety of criteria but worth verifying when making hiring decisions
  • Anticipating the unexpected and planning accordingly

“The retail business especially can be unpredictable, particularly if a ‘hot’ item captures consumer attention creating additional hiring needs. So it’s smart for employers to examine all variables that may impact the bottom line – including hiring costs,” Biffle said. “It can be very easy to neglect costs like these during the rush of the season when business is plentiful, but doing so can put a business in a serious financial bind.”

Conversely, Biffle said that seasonal workers should pay attention to any tax implications created by accepting a holiday job. Workers should ensure they factor in tax withholding to cover any tax liability (whether done through the employer or as a self-employed individual), including federal income tax, state income taxes, Social Security and Medicare (FICA) taxes, as well as any local taxes that may be required.

Sometimes the Best Advice is Tough to Give

Recently, I came across an article on a major clothing company highlighting a payroll hiccup during which the employees went temporarily unpaid. From the sounds of it, this company has been facing money problems for quite some time, ultimately filing for bankruptcy protection in October 2015. The company chalked up the problem to a procedural error by a global banking and financial services company, specifically stating that its money woes had nothing to do with it.

Whether the company’s line is true is not the point. Let’s assume for a moment the worst, that the payroll problem was related to the finances. Then, let’s take a moment to applaud them for making the responsible decision to hold the net payroll, temporarily, until all of the payrolls related obligations could be met.

A company’s ability to fulfill its payroll tax obligations has a direct impact on the company, the owner, investors and the employees. It affects the company’s very existence. The responsibility to collect and remit payroll taxes is statutory, required by law. The law states that a company has the burden to collect and remit payroll taxes from its employees when the employees are paid. Therefore, if payroll is delayed so is the obligation to remit the tax-related aspects of the payroll.

It goes without saying, but running a company with employees carries a host of responsibilities. After all, a company’s employees rely on it to provide for their general well-being. But, to a business owner, the importance of trust taxes, specifically payroll, cannot be overstated. Therefore, when beginning a new representation case, it is critical to introduce an educational component to the work. It’s imperative for clients to understand how to make good decisions in the face of financial distress. We understand that it’s certainly not easy to have a conversation with employees about a payroll being held. After all, those people are likely counting on it because of obligations of their own.  Nonetheless, this can be the correct decision in some cases.

Holding a payroll is not the only answer and in some cases can be the wrong answer to a tough spot. But compared with the fallout from missing a payroll tax deposit, such as an IRS levy, it can actually prevent a bad situation from getting much worse. Dealing with IRS Collections is about ensuring that a company facing duress survives for everyone involved over the long term. The questions about what to do and when make it vital to have a qualified and competent professional to lean on.

If you are a business owner and find yourself facing a payroll problem, make it a priority to give us a call today. The longer you wait, the more complicated and difficult your situation can become. If you happen to be a tax professional with a client who could use our assistance, either contact us directly or fill out our client referral form, here.